The Emotional World of Farm Animals 2004. —убтитры к фильму на английском €зыке.

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They number more than a billion in the U.S. alone,

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each with its own personality and its own sense of being.

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We see them in every state, every city,

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and practically every town in america,

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and yet, for all intents and purposes, they remain an enigma to us.

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They are the farm animals: cows, pigs, sheep, chickens, and turkeys.

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They are the animals we use for meat,

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yet, seldom get to meet.

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Animals we are now discovering lead rich and complex emotional lives.

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Join us on one man's journey;

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a voyage of discovery Е into the emotional world Е of farm animals.

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Jeffrey Masson is a former psychoanalyist who, nearly two decades ago,

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turned his attentions to writing about the emotions of non-human animals.

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His New York Times best-selling book when elephants weep,

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established undenyably

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that wild animals from all corners of the globe

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lead lives that are filled with a complex array of emotions,

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many similar to our own.

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Challenged by his publisher Random House

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to go where no one had gone before -

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to research and write a popular book about the emotions of farm animals -

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he reluctantly accepted,

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and soon set out on a quest that would take him around the world and to a dozen countries.

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Yet, his first stop was a sanctuary for farm animals in Vacaville, California,

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less than a hundred miles from his Berkeley home.

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C'mon, sweetie!

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Kim Sturla is the co-founder of Animal Place.

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Kim, this is a beautiful place!

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Thank you, it is,

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and especially this time of the year when it's so green; it's just gorgious.

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So do you mean to tell me that all the animals here

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have been rescued?

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Each one has come from a different situation.

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And with every animals there was no where else for them to go. So we were really kind of their last resort here.

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And with every animals there was no where else for them to go. So we were really kind of their last resort here.

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So you would say that every animal here

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has had some history of personal abuse?

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Most of the animals here, if not all, have had a really tough beginning,

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and it's just that much more important that once they get to Animal Place

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that we try to provide them with a secure.

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Loving environment where they can live out the rest of their lives.

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And do some of them, I mean, tell they've been abused by the way they react to you,

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or does it differ for each and every animal?

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You know, each and every one Е

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Venus, one of the pigs, she was terribly abused and we got her as an adult.

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It has taken her yearsЕ

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She's about thirteen years old now

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and only in the last couple of years will she actually let me pet her.

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So it's a question about trust?

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It's all about trust.

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Do you think she looks at you and thinks Е

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I don't trust this species

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but this one, this woman, Kim, she seems OK.

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Do you think they have thought processes like that?

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Oh, my gosh, without a doubt!

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Obviously, I wouldn't need to convince you

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that these farm animals have emotions?

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There is absolutely no doubt in my mind

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that those animals have a wide array of emotions;

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very similar to dogs and cats.

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As a seasoned author with two dozen books to his credit,

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Jeffrey knows full well that you can't write about the emotions of any animal

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until you first meet and get to know them.

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His first farm animal experience: Val and Susie.

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Hello sweetie girl! And they don't have tusks?

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Oh, the males do.

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The males do!

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Now are the males different than the females?

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No, no.

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They're all so sweet?
Oh, yes, very!

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Good natured, and you can play with them?

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And here's my favorite, Jeffrey.

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She is the sweetest pig one could possibly meet Е Susie.

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Come here, Susie! Susie!

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They had their little difficulties introducing them.

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Oh, so they weren't Е Oh, Susie!

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What made this experience so special for Jeffrey

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was learning from Kim about Val and Susie's history.

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If not for Animal Place their lives would be different indeed.

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In fact, they wouldn't be alive at all.

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SIX MONTHS EARLIER

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Little Susie and Valerie were pigs

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that were born inside a research laboratory.

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A cage is all they knew.

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You have to understand that these little pigs had never been outside.

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Hi! OK, who wants to be cooled down? Come on!

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They had never felt the sunshine on them.

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They had never had the ground to root in. They never had grass.

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They had always lived their entire life inside a little cage

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measuring probably four feet square.

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That was their existence.

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So they came to Animal Place and were a bit in shock,

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because there were all of these other animal sounds

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and they all of a sudden had freedom.

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They could do whatever they wanted to do.

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They arrived during the summer months

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and I found, quickly found, that one of the things they loved to do

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is to be cooled off when it gets too hot.

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Get you cooled down!

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Normally val and susie would be cooling themselves off

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with mud baths, as pigs do,

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but they were recently spayed and the stitches hadn't healed yet,

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so we wanted to keep them clean.

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So when it gets real hot here,

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I make there big huge ice cube blocks in our freezer,

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and I call them over to me,

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and I just rub them down with ice cubes.

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and they thoroughly thorooughly enjoy it Е

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As I think almost any kid would when it's a hot day,

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if they can't jump in a pool.

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And, yeah, I just ice them all down and we just kind of play.

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They get silly and romp around and i get silly with them and Е

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It's a, it's just a play time for both of us.

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People come here for tours and they think

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Gosh, what lucky animals!

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Well, you know, I see it the other way around. I mean, I feel so fortunate that I Е

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I'm allowed to take care of them,

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I'm allowed to be in their company,

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that I can be with them every day and interact with them.

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It doesn't get much better than that, to know you saved their life

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and ensure that the remainder of their life is going to be good.

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Ned Buyukmihci is a veterinarian,

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who, with Kim, co-founded Animal Place.

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Considering how their lives began,

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and for the fact that they were destined from birth for the slaughter house,

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the cows at Animal Place have learned from Kim and Ned

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that some humans can be trusted Е

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Although that trust has taken years to develop

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and must be reinforced practically every day.

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Jessie's story is one of these that you Е

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you would think is made up.

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That, that, she was about a month old and she was, she was in Colorado

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and, she jumped out of the truck

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and, she jumped out of the truck

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when the truck was going down the freeway and she shattered her left hind leg.

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You can see how badly deformed it is.

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And she was just lieing there badly bruised and,

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and in really bad shape,

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and two people who were coming to visit Animal Place, Gene and Lorri Bauston,

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happened to be on the freeway behind this truck.

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It was just unbelievable!

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And they see this little black form on the highway and they stoped,

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and the farmer had stopped, of course,

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and the farmer did not want Jessie because she was no longer valuable to him

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because she couldn't be sold.

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She had a fractured leg, she was down, she couldn't stand up.

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And so, he gave her to Gene and Lorri who brought her to Animal Place.

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We took Jessie in to, to my university hospital and radiographed her leg,

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and it was very badly fractured, beyond surgical repair.

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And, in fact, my colleagues said we should kill her,

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And, I said: No, we'll give her a chance. we'll see what happens.

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we can always kill her.

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So we gave her stall rest

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and within two months she was standing up and walking on the leg.

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And within four or five months she was running on the leg.

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Running? What a will to live!

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Yeah, well, cows are known for their healing abilities.

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Look at that! Now, Ned, you know dogs, you love dogs, you live around dogs.

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Do you think cows are every bit as emotional as dogs Е

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Just in a different way!

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I mean, we read dogs very easily Е they communicate with us,

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they look the way we want them to look - they look sad, they look disappointed, they look happy.

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Cows are harder to read, but from what you've been telling me

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they probably have most of the same emotions that dogs do.

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Oh, I think they do.

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I knew a steer once when I was in practice.

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He was raised like a puppy would be raised,

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very close to the family and isolated from other cows

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so he never got to kow cows very well,

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and he was like a puppy.

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He ran and played and came running to the people and he would Е he'd be curious,

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I'd be out there taking care of a sheep or somebody and he would run up and had to check things out.

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and so he was expressing emotions,

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in a dog you'd say he was happy.

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Part of the problem, again, with cows is that they are not usually in a setting

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where they can express those emotions or be free to express those emotions.

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When you go to a typical sitution where cows are,

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they're scared, they're huddled, they're nervous about human interaction

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you see the emotion but it's usually fear.

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An expectant mother gives birth to her offspring.

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A beautiful bouncing baby boyЕ

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All sixty pounds of him Е

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Thrust from the womb in one mighty heave.

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The proud mom licks her newborn for hours.

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Her licking not only cleans the calf, but also helps develop strong familial ties,

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that would normally last well into his first few years of life.

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Cows are extraordinarily curious and social animals,

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and the birth of this calf seems to heighten that curiosity among all of the surrounding females,

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who move in closely for sniffs and gentle nudges.

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Perhaps their way of welcoming him to his new world.

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This calf, like all others before him, will never know of his proud and dignified bloodlines.

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All of today's cows are descendants of the mighty auroch,

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a gigantic creature nearly six feet tall,

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which first appeared during the Pleistocene Period.

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Magnificent paintings adorning the walls deep in the caves of Lescoux, France,

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depict the auroch and signify their significant role as a prey species for prehistoric humans.

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Today's cows, no matter the variety in shape, size or color,

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are all descended from a single species,

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whose hooves once pounded the dirt by the millions, from Europe, to Asia, to Northern Africa Е

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and whose last member died in Poland in 1627.

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Meeting these first few animals convinced Jeffrey

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that, just like animals found in nature, farm animals have their own story to tell,

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and it will be through his experiences and writing that this story will be told.

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So this is Freddie.

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This is Freddie.
Freddie, you like that.

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Freddie was found on the freway.

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SIX MONTHS EARLIER

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The California highway patrol officers just found this little five-pound piglet

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roaming the freway.

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He was the sickest animal we had ever taken into the sanctuary.

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He had beginning stages of pneumonia,

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he had what's called white muscle disease, he had a mineral deficiency,

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he had obvious abrasions on his back from his fall from the truck

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and he had a number of other problems.

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OK, Freedie.

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Come on, sweetie! Come on!

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OK, meal time.

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Freddie was fed cow's milk by the girl who rescued him.

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So when arrived at Animal Place,

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we were very gradual in switching him over to a pig milk replacement.

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Well, you know, when we get in a young animal,

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we have to look at ways of how we can, we can nurture them,

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how we can feed their stomach, and how we can feed them emotionally.

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And knowing what a mother sow, how she would care for her young -

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there would generally be a lot of siblings he would have,

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they would be nestled up in that big old fat sow belly,

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nursing on her and just getting a lot of tactile stimulation and a lot of warmth -

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so, I immkediately went out and bought a baby sling

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that mothers use for their newborn infants Е

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and tucked Freddie inside that sling so that he could hear my heart beat,

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he could hear me breathing,

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he would abviously have a lot of warmth, temperature warmth from my body,

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and just as my motion throughout the day, whether I'm preparing his meal,

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one of his many meals that he wold eat throughout the day

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because we fed him about every hour and a half,

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or I'm working on my computer, that he Е I was with him.

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And he seemed to gain a lot of comfort from that.

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Freddie may live out his life in the security of Animal Place,

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yet he will never be too far removed from the ways of his wild cousins.

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Try as they may, those who today raise pigs in the confinement of commercial farms,

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cannot remove through domestication the varying degrees of wildness that all pigs retain.

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Born in litters of five to six, the young piglets tend to play and sleep together,

243
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developing bonds that may last throughout their lifetime.

244
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As they grow older and move more confidently throughout the herd,

245
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they learn the ways of wild pigs by watching the adults around them,

246
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especially their mother, who is never far away.

247
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Early on, these piglets learn to root through the dirt,

248
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sniffing out tasty morsels like roots,

249
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which are part of their diverse diet,

250
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along with acorns, grasses, berries, eggs, and small invertebrates.

251
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Pigs are emotionally sensitive animals

252
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and exhibit mood swings not unlike humans.

253
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When the kids get too frisky, mother is not adverse to putting them in their place.

254
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It's only his pride that is hurt,

255
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but that's how piglets learn to make it to adulthood,

256
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for natural mortality among piglets is quite high.

257
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Learning to feed on their own takes months,

258
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and during the learning curve, mother is still the best meal in town.

259
00:18:56,203 --> 00:18:58,275
At six months of age, the piglets have grown large enough

260
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to join the ranks of the other adults in the herd,

261
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and in a short period of time they will have integrated fully into this society.

262
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Given the opportunity to meet humans, wild pigs can exhibit a side of themselves

263
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few of us would ever have expected.

264
00:19:18,592 --> 00:19:22,796
When Jeffrey's research took him half way around the globe to Germany,

265
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he was informed time and again about a well-known incident

266
00:19:26,396 --> 00:19:31,171
that took place in the Black Forest nearly thirty years earlier.

267
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In an extraordinary experiment back in the early 1970s,

268
00:19:36,677 --> 00:19:39,153
Heinz Meinhardt, a German electrician,

269
00:19:39,277 --> 00:19:44,553
set out on an assignment to draw wild pigs away from farm fields,

270
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where they were eating everything in sight.

271
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In the process, Meinhardt got to know each of the pigs in this large community,

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and he began to see if they could ultimately accept his presence.

273
00:19:57,865 --> 00:20:01,339
Meinhardt spent many months getting the pigs used to him,

274
00:20:01,465 --> 00:20:05,839
gaining their trust by posing no threat to their safety or security.

275
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Eventually, he was fully accepted.

276
00:20:08,743 --> 00:20:13,914
What Meinhardt was able to accomplish with wild pigs is no less impressive

277
00:20:14,014 --> 00:20:17,087
than the extraordinary relationship Diane Fossey developed

278
00:20:17,214 --> 00:20:20,087
with the mountain gorillas of Rwanda:

279
00:20:20,154 --> 00:20:24,691
Total acceptance. Total trust.

280
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It didn't take Jeffrey long to realize

281
00:20:32,263 --> 00:20:35,769
that, just like the wild animals he has studied and written about,

282
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farm animals also possess individual personalities,

283
00:20:40,669 --> 00:20:43,443
and all the emotions that go with it.

284
00:20:43,510 --> 00:20:47,281
Jeffrey is a former psychoanalyst, not a scientist,

285
00:20:47,310 --> 00:20:51,281
and as such he has often been accused of ascribing human characteristics

286
00:20:51,381 --> 00:20:53,287
to non-human animals.

287
00:20:53,387 --> 00:20:55,359
They even have a fancy term for it.

288
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It's called anthropomorphism.

289
00:20:58,892 --> 00:21:01,536
Yet, there are scientists who can expand their thoughts

290
00:21:01,692 --> 00:21:04,036
well beyond conventional wisdom,

291
00:21:04,592 --> 00:21:09,036
and in doing so, see the bigger picture that is starting to come into focus.

292
00:21:09,469 --> 00:21:15,679
One of these is Marc Bekoff, professor of biology at the University of Colorado

293
00:21:15,869 --> 00:21:19,079
and one of the world's leading authorities on animal emotions.

294
00:21:19,179 --> 00:21:21,450
...anthropomorphic, I call it one of the "A" words.

295
00:21:21,579 --> 00:21:23,050
It's kind of a dirty word.

296
00:21:23,150 --> 00:21:27,091
But there's no way that I can communicate what I'm learning

297
00:21:27,250 --> 00:21:31,091
and seeing and studying in an animal without being anthropomorphic.

298
00:21:31,225 --> 00:21:34,964
Anthropomorphism is attributing human characteristics

299
00:21:35,125 --> 00:21:37,564
to non-human beings.

300
00:21:40,367 --> 00:21:44,977
If I tell you that a cow in the pasture was sad,

301
00:21:45,267 --> 00:21:49,177
was lamenting her place,

302
00:21:49,377 --> 00:21:52,720
I'm not saying she's sad in the same way I'm sad,

303
00:21:52,977 --> 00:21:56,720
but all I had to do was look at her posture to know she was kind of sulked down,

304
00:21:57,077 --> 00:21:59,720
kid of just looked lethargic.

305
00:21:59,920 --> 00:22:02,789
I can't think of any other way to communicate that.

306
00:22:04,658 --> 00:22:08,162
I could tell you about her dopamine and her seratonin

307
00:22:08,228 --> 00:22:11,137
and I could tell you about the muscle tone in her legs and her muscles and tendons,

308
00:22:11,328 --> 00:22:16,737
but that doesn't capture that she was either happy or sad.

309
00:22:16,870 --> 00:22:18,410
So I think we need to be anthropomorphic,

310
00:22:18,570 --> 00:22:23,010
simply taking into account the world of the animal

311
00:22:23,110 --> 00:22:27,147
but using human terms to describe their behavior.

312
00:22:29,216 --> 00:22:32,690
When I was growing up and being trained as an ethologist,

313
00:22:33,757 --> 00:22:39,429
one of the key lessons to learn was not to anthropomorphise,

314
00:22:39,757 --> 00:22:42,129
not to give animals qualities that were reserved for humans.

315
00:22:42,229 --> 00:22:46,203
Leslie Rodgers is a professor of neuroscience and animal behavior

316
00:22:46,429 --> 00:22:49,703
at Australia's University of New England.

317
00:22:50,170 --> 00:22:51,642
but that's changed.

318
00:22:51,870 --> 00:22:55,642
I mean basically it's changed since the eighties.

319
00:22:57,110 --> 00:23:02,722
So it's now becoming more and more acceptable for people who study animal behavior

320
00:23:03,110 --> 00:23:08,722
to at least be looking at these as possibilities and studying

321
00:23:08,989 --> 00:23:11,328
where as, say, twenty to thirty years ago

322
00:23:11,989 --> 00:23:14,328
this would not have been considered acceptable research,

323
00:23:14,528 --> 00:23:18,165
I can say now that it is acceptable research.

324
00:23:18,298 --> 00:23:21,073
The issue of emotion and thinking in animals

325
00:23:21,298 --> 00:23:26,473
is now seen as something that you can study scientifically,

326
00:23:26,540 --> 00:23:30,346
I mean, it's not without it's problems Е It's quite a complex thing

327
00:23:30,540 --> 00:23:32,346
to put one's mind to.

328
00:23:32,412 --> 00:23:36,817
So, we certainly don't have all the answers there before us,

329
00:23:36,917 --> 00:23:43,857
but they are seen as problems that are worthwhile, approaching it in a scientific method.

330
00:23:45,492 --> 00:23:48,231
If we just look at the cognative abilities of a chicken

331
00:23:48,492 --> 00:23:50,731
in the first few days of life,

332
00:23:50,831 --> 00:23:54,105
they form very good memories. they learn fantastically.

333
00:23:54,831 --> 00:24:01,105
They have individual characteristics that they can recognize one individual chick from another.

334
00:24:01,205 --> 00:24:07,648
They form representations, they can recognize objects that were hidden behind other things.

335
00:24:08,949 --> 00:24:11,622
Very complex cognative abilities

336
00:24:11,949 --> 00:24:14,822
that we've seen even as being unique to humans

337
00:24:14,988 --> 00:24:19,726
are now being shown in the young domestic chick.

338
00:24:26,800 --> 00:24:29,509
A couple hundred miles north of Animal Place,

339
00:24:29,800 --> 00:24:31,509
over the rolling hills of Orland, California,

340
00:24:31,800 --> 00:24:35,009
lies Farm Sanctuary,

341
00:24:35,109 --> 00:24:38,912
which, coupled with its main facility in Watkins Glen, New York,

342
00:24:39,012 --> 00:24:43,450
is one of the largest farm animal sanctuaries in the world.

343
00:24:43,617 --> 00:24:48,025
Sanctuaries represent one of the few places where farm animals can really be themselves,

344
00:24:48,617 --> 00:24:52,025
without the stress of the factory farming ordeal,

345
00:24:52,192 --> 00:24:58,699
and, as such, are the perfect environment for ќeffrey to study their true emotions.

346
00:25:02,503 --> 00:25:06,042
Diane Miller is the west coast manager of this six hundred acre haven

347
00:25:06,303 --> 00:25:09,042
for once-abused farm animals,

348
00:25:09,109 --> 00:25:11,081
that can now look forward to a life of peace,

349
00:25:11,209 --> 00:25:14,681
security, and lots of tender loving care.

350
00:25:14,815 --> 00:25:17,692
Diane, I have to tell you this is the first time i've ever felt

351
00:25:17,815 --> 00:25:22,492
I was bcoming intimate with a chicken, that i've held one this close to my Е

352
00:25:22,615 --> 00:25:25,692
Well, I'm sorry you've been deprived.
Well, clearly I've been deprived.

353
00:25:25,759 --> 00:25:28,932
I didn't realize that these animals cold become so...

354
00:25:29,359 --> 00:25:31,532
interested in us, so close to us.

355
00:25:31,632 --> 00:25:37,404
Is that fairly common? Can you have an intimate close relationship with a chicken?

356
00:25:37,604 --> 00:25:40,077
You certainly can. I have several good friends who are chickens,

357
00:25:40,404 --> 00:25:44,077
who listen to me much better than my people friends do.

358
00:25:44,178 --> 00:25:46,213
And don't answer back, or sometimes do?

359
00:25:46,480 --> 00:25:49,850
Sometimes they do, but they're very good listeners.

360
00:25:49,917 --> 00:25:52,653
And clearly it's not just a one-sided relationship,

361
00:25:53,153 --> 00:25:57,491
I mean, she's deriving pleasure from this and i'm getting pleasure from this.

362
00:25:57,591 --> 00:25:59,793
I'd say she's enjoying that immensely.

363
00:25:59,927 --> 00:26:04,463
She certainly has all the same potential that a person has

364
00:26:04,627 --> 00:26:07,963
for intimacy and affection and caring and bonds between certain individuals.

365
00:26:08,168 --> 00:26:10,838
How unusual when you think about it.

366
00:26:11,105 --> 00:26:13,577
After all we don't have a history

367
00:26:13,705 --> 00:26:15,577
of having behaved very kindly toward these animals, do we?

368
00:26:15,805 --> 00:26:16,977
That's absolutely right.

369
00:26:29,923 --> 00:26:35,563
This beautiful, beautiful turkey here. looks like a rainbow of colors.

370
00:26:35,696 --> 00:26:39,733
I've never touched this before. It feels so wonderful.

371
00:26:39,867 --> 00:26:41,571
I never knew that their emotions

372
00:26:41,867 --> 00:26:44,571
are actually reflected on, what do you call this part of their face?

373
00:26:44,771 --> 00:26:50,144
This, the long dangly here is called their snood.

374
00:26:50,244 --> 00:26:52,546
Apparently it registers all of his emotions?

375
00:26:53,046 --> 00:26:56,688
Right. The head, skin and neck and the snood on a tom turkey

376
00:26:57,846 --> 00:27:01,588
is really a barometer of their emotions. It's how they communicate with one another.

377
00:27:01,688 --> 00:27:05,531
And what happens is when a tom is feeling real good,

378
00:27:05,688 --> 00:27:08,431
he's strutting and he's happy and life is good, and he's feeling good,

379
00:27:08,588 --> 00:27:10,531
he'll be deep red color.

380
00:27:10,631 --> 00:27:16,035
And they have the capacity to change the color, their whole skin tone, all of their head and their neck and their snood,

381
00:27:16,135 --> 00:27:19,882
from totally white or light blue like you see around his eyes.

382
00:27:20,135 --> 00:27:24,682
So they can go from light blue or white to all the way deep red.

383
00:27:24,835 --> 00:27:27,882
And when they're happy and they're strutting and life is good, they're deep magenta red.

384
00:27:27,995 --> 00:27:30,182
So, that's how they communicate with one another.

385
00:27:30,350 --> 00:27:32,386
And they can do that immediately?

386
00:27:32,520 --> 00:27:36,089
Right. within a few seconds.
Within a few seconds!

387
00:27:43,096 --> 00:27:45,568
Turkeys are the only farm animals

388
00:27:45,796 --> 00:27:48,268
bred from north American wildlife.

389
00:27:48,368 --> 00:27:53,778
Benjamin Franklin considered the turkey a noble bird and often wrote of its worthiness

390
00:27:53,968 --> 00:27:57,778
to be considered America's national emblem.

391
00:27:58,378 --> 00:28:02,186
Had his efforts been successful, one can only wonder

392
00:28:02,378 --> 00:28:06,186
if that honor might have changed the way we treat them today.

393
00:28:28,208 --> 00:28:31,750
Lorri Bauston is the co-founder of Farm Sanctuary,

394
00:28:31,908 --> 00:28:36,850
who wanted to make sure that jeffrey had a chance to get to know some of her special friends Е

395
00:28:37,084 --> 00:28:42,990
all of whom came here as rescues from the dairy industry, or meat processors.

396
00:28:43,123 --> 00:28:45,893
Well, this is loverboy, Valentino. As you can see,

397
00:28:45,959 --> 00:28:49,597
he has a well-earned name. He's just basically Е
Because he's so kind?

398
00:28:49,764 --> 00:28:55,470
Yeah. He's cuddly, he kind and he's lovable. he's one of the animals that consistently

399
00:28:55,670 --> 00:28:58,442
is one of our best ambassadors because he's constantly coming up to visitors.

400
00:28:58,670 --> 00:29:01,742
They need affection. they love affection.

401
00:29:01,909 --> 00:29:05,047
I mean, he will, if he was laying down right now he'd wrap himself around you like a dog, you know, just like if you're leaning next to a dog Е

402
00:29:07,181 --> 00:29:11,118
So it's not true that there's just nothing going on inside that huge head?

403
00:29:11,218 --> 00:29:13,721
Oh, no. All kinds of stuff.

404
00:29:13,888 --> 00:29:17,230
Mainly, he loves to give me kisses.

405
00:29:18,288 --> 00:29:23,230
They're really sociable animals. they need a lot of attention. they need a lot of love.

406
00:29:23,397 --> 00:29:25,268
Lorri, can you tell me about one of the most emotional moments

407
00:29:25,497 --> 00:29:27,868
you've ever had with an animal?

408
00:29:28,035 --> 00:29:30,776
Probably and most recently, Queenie,

409
00:29:30,935 --> 00:29:35,876
who was a cow who took matters into her own hoofs and she escaped from a New York city slaughte rhouse.

410
00:29:46,653 --> 00:29:51,298
The slaughter house was in a real busy area of Queens,

411
00:29:51,553 --> 00:29:54,598
and she was running through the streets,

412
00:29:54,753 --> 00:29:57,598
dodging cars while they were chasing her.

413
00:29:57,798 --> 00:30:04,104
She was dodging bikes, pedestrians. Obviously, she was terrified and frightened and was running.

414
00:30:04,338 --> 00:30:09,614
And by this time a whole force of NYPD cars had joined in the chase

415
00:30:09,838 --> 00:30:14,114
trying to capture her before she hurt herself or hurt another person.

416
00:30:17,117 --> 00:30:20,725
And it was an incredible scene of this animal

417
00:30:21,117 --> 00:30:24,725
just running for her life through the streets of New York city.

418
00:30:33,534 --> 00:30:39,116
Fortunately, she ran into a park and from there they closed the gates to the park

419
00:30:39,434 --> 00:30:44,116
and they were able to kind of corral her and then wrestle her to the ground

420
00:30:44,734 --> 00:30:49,116
And all the NYPD, you know, officials at that point became cowboys.

421
00:30:53,754 --> 00:30:57,625
This animal who was saved from slaughter, who saved herself from slaughter,

422
00:30:57,754 --> 00:30:59,525
touched millions of people, because it really was people who called into animal control saying:

423
00:30:59,792 --> 00:31:02,429
Hey, this cow deserves her freedom!

424
00:31:02,563 --> 00:31:07,734
Because they saw it on the news, so she moved millions of New Yorkers.

425
00:31:09,536 --> 00:31:12,008
It was sad, of course, because they did have to, you know, chase her down to the ground

426
00:31:12,436 --> 00:31:15,508
and tie her up so she wouldn't injure herself,

427
00:31:15,742 --> 00:31:22,783
but, of course, it was instrumental in getting this cow to the safety of farm sanctuary.

428
00:31:38,265 --> 00:31:40,435
I'll never forget because there was a cop there

429
00:31:40,565 --> 00:31:41,935
who, once she was on the ground...

430
00:31:42,102 --> 00:31:44,674
And of course she was terrified, frightened, she clearly knew

431
00:31:44,802 --> 00:31:47,674
what was in store for her at the slaughter house when she ran, and the poor thing was chased and Е

432
00:31:47,841 --> 00:31:54,381
He held her and he put her head in his lap and he just held her and stroked her.

433
00:31:54,515 --> 00:31:57,558
And that's just the kind of magical moment we see all the time at Farm Sanctuary

434
00:31:57,915 --> 00:32:02,258
where a person dos finally bond with a farm animal and realizes

435
00:32:02,415 --> 00:32:04,558
that these farm animals feel and have feelings too.

436
00:32:06,927 --> 00:32:09,897
She was shaking, fearful and we loaded her up into the truck

437
00:32:10,197 --> 00:32:13,534
and we're trying to comfort her and tell her she's going to a wonderful place.

438
00:32:13,700 --> 00:32:16,274
We got to the sanctuary and. i'll never forget this:

439
00:32:16,400 --> 00:32:20,274
she stepped off the trailer and let out a big Moo, and...

440
00:32:20,474 --> 00:32:23,113
See, when all the animals first come in they have to be in a separate area

441
00:32:23,246 --> 00:32:26,551
to make sure they're pest-free and all that kind of stuff,

442
00:32:26,746 --> 00:32:29,251
and make sure they're healthy enough before they can be with the other cattle Е

443
00:32:29,446 --> 00:32:30,651
So she had to be in a separate area.

444
00:32:30,851 --> 00:32:34,561
When she let out that Moo,

445
00:32:34,851 --> 00:32:38,061
all of the other sanctuary cows gathered around to the closest fence

446
00:32:38,251 --> 00:32:40,561
and started mooing back.

447
00:32:40,694 --> 00:32:44,569
And then she started mooing, and they started mooing,

448
00:32:44,694 --> 00:32:49,169
And there was this whole incredible loving exchange.

449
00:32:49,303 --> 00:32:51,343
So the cows are mooing and we're crying...

450
00:32:51,503 --> 00:32:56,343
And it was just such an incredible wonderful feeling!

451
00:32:56,543 --> 00:33:00,114
She really felt at home and the other cattle really made her feel at home.

452
00:33:00,248 --> 00:33:04,518
And I just again saw, you know, they're no different than us.

453
00:33:04,751 --> 00:33:07,593
Queenie will spend the rest of her life at Farm Sanctuary,

454
00:33:07,751 --> 00:33:12,593
and by all rights will never experience another moment of fear.

455
00:33:12,759 --> 00:33:16,597
But how can we be so sure about how she feels?

456
00:33:17,331 --> 00:33:25,170
Marc Bekoff: Often times a lucky animal escapes from or is released from a slaughter house condition,

457
00:33:25,331 --> 00:33:27,170
and winds up on a sanctuary.

458
00:33:27,370 --> 00:33:31,912
And when you study these animals, you see very clearly how emotional they are.

459
00:33:32,179 --> 00:33:35,282
They go through this period of maybe lack of trust - they're not sure -

460
00:33:35,482 --> 00:33:38,252
to a very slow bonding,

461
00:33:38,418 --> 00:33:42,890
and you see their demeanor change: their posture, their stance, their gate.

462
00:33:43,124 --> 00:33:45,562
If they vocalize, if they have expressive faces.

463
00:33:45,724 --> 00:33:48,962
And you see that over time, they let their guard down.

464
00:33:49,062 --> 00:33:51,565
And the reason that they're doing that is they're not sure,

465
00:33:51,765 --> 00:33:54,369
And when you start making claims about whether an animal is sure about something,

466
00:33:54,765 --> 00:33:58,369
you're saying that that animal is experiencing feelings.

467
00:33:59,036 --> 00:34:04,311
And you need to make this very slow transition from a feeling of mistrust to a feeling of trust.

468
00:34:05,445 --> 00:34:11,486
Once Jeffrey got to meet these farm animals - the cows, pigs, sheep, chickens, and turkeys -

469
00:34:11,645 --> 00:34:15,486
spend time with them, observe their interactions with others of their kind,

470
00:34:15,719 --> 00:34:19,626
and watch their personalities unfold before his eyes

471
00:34:20,027 --> 00:34:23,667
it made him wonder if we can ever truly associate

472
00:34:23,927 --> 00:34:27,367
the sentient animals with the meat on our dinner plates.

473
00:34:27,668 --> 00:34:31,138
Queenie is but a dramatic example of what he is refering to.

474
00:34:31,472 --> 00:34:35,178
In reality, she's no different from the billions of farm animals

475
00:34:35,472 --> 00:34:37,678
raised every year for slaughter.

476
00:34:37,845 --> 00:34:42,184
The hundreds of phone calls to Animal Control pleading to save Queenie's life,

477
00:34:42,345 --> 00:34:44,184
did just that!

478
00:34:44,351 --> 00:34:47,024
As a psychoanalyst, Jeffrey had to wonder.

479
00:34:47,251 --> 00:34:50,824
In the minds of all the caring people who made those calls,

480
00:34:50,924 --> 00:34:54,462
what qualities did Queenie possess that the millions of cows,

481
00:34:54,596 --> 00:35:00,200
pigs, sheep, chickens, or turkeys waiting in line to be killed Е did not?

482
00:35:00,367 --> 00:35:04,838
The answer seemed obvious to him: none.

483
00:35:12,012 --> 00:35:17,017
One element of Jeffrfey's research has remained unresolved in his mind.

484
00:35:17,117 --> 00:35:22,256
the organized programs that allow school children to spend months raising farm animals,

485
00:35:22,389 --> 00:35:26,759
naming them like a companion animal, caring for them every day,

486
00:35:26,959 --> 00:35:33,934
exhibiting them with all due pride, then, just like that, giving them up for slaughter.

487
00:35:35,302 --> 00:35:36,972
He asked Jim Mason,

488
00:35:37,202 --> 00:35:38,772
a farm boy turned lawyer and animal activist,

489
00:35:38,939 --> 00:35:45,179
and co-author of the ground-breaking book Animal Factories, published back in 1990.

490
00:35:45,646 --> 00:35:48,982
Jim's history with this goes back to his early teens.

491
00:35:49,116 --> 00:35:51,354
I was deemed to be big enough then to help with the

492
00:35:51,516 --> 00:35:54,354
what we call working the calves, which means castrating them,

493
00:35:54,955 --> 00:36:01,462
de-horning them, and clipping their ears and doing all these painful things.

494
00:36:01,662 --> 00:36:04,768
And as a young child they let me watch all of this. So I knew it was terrible.

495
00:36:04,962 --> 00:36:07,768
I saw the terror in the animals. I saw the violance and the struggling with them and everything.

496
00:36:07,968 --> 00:36:11,605
And yet that day it was my turn to go out and help with all this.

497
00:36:11,738 --> 00:36:14,541
And I remember as we were going over the fence I started crying

498
00:36:14,675 --> 00:36:18,111
because I knew what I was going to have to do.

499
00:36:18,679 --> 00:36:21,949
And my uncle said, and his exact words, they ring in my ears, he said:

500
00:36:22,015 --> 00:36:24,687
If you don't straighten up and act like a man,

501
00:36:24,815 --> 00:36:26,687
we'll send you back to the house with the girls.

502
00:36:26,787 --> 00:36:29,656
You're a sissy if you don't go with us.

503
00:36:29,790 --> 00:36:31,763
When I was on a farm at that age

504
00:36:31,990 --> 00:36:35,863
I actually didn't belong to farm kid groups, but my brother did.

505
00:36:36,130 --> 00:36:40,467
And there were a lot of other kinds of groups like that that prepared you to be a farmer.

506
00:36:40,567 --> 00:36:47,107
One of the most common projects is raising like a heffer or a pig or a steer or something for show.

507
00:36:47,207 --> 00:36:49,778
Then they go to the state fair and show these animals

508
00:36:49,907 --> 00:36:51,078
and they win ribbons.

509
00:36:51,211 --> 00:36:53,083
You see these kids that spend so much time with these animals

510
00:36:53,211 --> 00:36:56,083
and really get attached to them almost like pets.

511
00:36:56,216 --> 00:37:00,287
And then comes the time when they have to part ways with that animal.

512
00:37:00,454 --> 00:37:02,523
They have to go to slaughter. They have to go to auction.

513
00:37:02,689 --> 00:37:06,527
And often it's very traumatic for these kids.

514
00:37:07,061 --> 00:37:09,100
Even though you've been close to this animal,

515
00:37:09,261 --> 00:37:11,300
you've groomed it and maybe slept with it for weeks

516
00:37:11,461 --> 00:37:13,300
it has to go to market.

517
00:37:13,534 --> 00:37:15,973
This is how they say it, when you get your first animal they tell you:

518
00:37:16,134 --> 00:37:19,573
You always cry with your first animal, but you get used to it.

519
00:37:20,040 --> 00:37:22,676
You get used to it...

520
00:37:22,810 --> 00:37:27,714
I'm like, what do you mean by that, you know, I mean you get used to it.

521
00:37:27,915 --> 00:37:32,986
OK. You get used to the fact that something you get attached to for months is taken from you and killed.

522
00:37:33,086 --> 00:37:37,691
I mean, how are you supposed to get used to that? I couldn't get used to it.

523
00:37:38,158 --> 00:37:42,296
Misty Vina is a high-school student from San Jose, California,

524
00:37:42,563 --> 00:37:48,101
who went through this program only once, with a steer she named Ferdinand.

525
00:37:48,268 --> 00:37:53,040
I had him for ten months and it was every day I was out there Е

526
00:38:08,489 --> 00:38:11,460
It would have been easier if we had planned for him to be slaughtered from the start.

527
00:38:11,689 --> 00:38:13,960
He wasn't supposed to be.

528
00:38:14,227 --> 00:38:19,066
So it's kind of it came like out of nowhere on me.

529
00:38:19,266 --> 00:38:22,102
I was out there, I'd get up at five o'clock or five-thirty every morning

530
00:38:22,202 --> 00:38:24,274
and be out at school two hours before it started

531
00:38:24,574 --> 00:38:29,112
and I'd go out there, I'd stay out there for a for while in the morning, feed him and everything

532
00:38:29,374 --> 00:38:32,112
and then i'd be out there lunch most of the time.

533
00:38:32,212 --> 00:38:37,621
And then I had two periods of agriculture and I was usually out there before then anyways,

534
00:38:37,812 --> 00:38:40,621
and I'd stay after school until four-thirty every day after school with him.

535
00:38:42,121 --> 00:38:46,464
At first, I thought: What am i doing with a cow? This is so stupid, right?

536
00:38:46,731 --> 00:38:48,568
It was a steer and its like, this is

537
00:38:48,731 --> 00:38:50,868
I thought it was going to be easy

538
00:38:51,131 --> 00:38:54,768
And then he turned into, seriously, I always told everybody he's like a big puppy.

539
00:38:54,868 --> 00:38:59,506
I would call him and he would come over to me and he'd put his nose in his halter for me...

540
00:38:59,640 --> 00:39:01,477
And it's like when I went to visit him, they had him at the fair.

541
00:39:01,640 --> 00:39:07,377
And I went over there and I called his name and
his little ear turned up and he turned around and he started mooing,

542
00:39:07,477 --> 00:39:10,818
And I started crying, and everyone was like: There she goes again. And I'm likeЕ

543
00:39:11,585 --> 00:39:16,156
For people to say they don't have emotions, they don't know you're there, it's not true.

544
00:39:18,058 --> 00:39:22,999
The idea of discovery and proof of an internal emotional event

545
00:39:23,158 --> 00:39:30,599
is harder to prove, harder to control, and harder to justify

546
00:39:30,699 --> 00:39:35,108
in what sense that should be taken on board by anybody and for what reason.

547
00:39:35,242 --> 00:39:38,515
Gisella Kaplan is a professor of animal behavior

548
00:39:38,742 --> 00:39:41,215
at Australia's University of New England.

549
00:39:41,448 --> 00:39:45,588
I'm absolutely convinced that across the animal world,

550
00:39:45,748 --> 00:39:49,188
including our farm animals, certainly we know it of our pets.

551
00:39:49,321 --> 00:39:52,496
We know when they cry, we know when they're sad,

552
00:39:52,621 --> 00:39:56,196
we know when they have grief, as pet owners.

553
00:39:56,363 --> 00:40:03,804
The same may apply even to animals that for centuries have been domesticated.

554
00:40:03,937 --> 00:40:08,542
But I've no doubt that those factors exist very strongly.

555
00:40:13,313 --> 00:40:16,155
The changes that have transpired in our understanding

556
00:40:16,313 --> 00:40:18,555
and perception and empathy for farm animals

557
00:40:18,713 --> 00:40:21,555
were not ones that occurred overnight.

558
00:40:21,688 --> 00:40:26,627
Nor is it easy to bookmark the points in history at which they have taken place.

559
00:40:26,827 --> 00:40:31,268
I think we're looking at a period of at least three hundred years of change,

560
00:40:31,427 --> 00:40:37,268
starting about 1700, when people first began to realize

561
00:40:37,406 --> 00:40:42,743
that humans and the other species are built on the same anatomical template.

562
00:40:42,876 --> 00:40:45,050
Davis Fraser is a professor of animal welfare

563
00:40:45,876 --> 00:40:50,050
at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.

564
00:40:50,217 --> 00:40:53,356
We're not only built on the same anatomical template,

565
00:40:53,517 --> 00:40:56,356
but we share a common ancestry as well.

566
00:40:57,357 --> 00:40:59,431
Through the work of people like Jane Goodall,

567
00:40:59,657 --> 00:41:03,931
we have come to see animals, even in scientific study,

568
00:41:04,064 --> 00:41:06,205
not just as date points

569
00:41:06,464 --> 00:41:11,405
helping to establish some kind of average or norm for the species,

570
00:41:11,538 --> 00:41:16,577
but more as persons with individual life histories

571
00:41:16,710 --> 00:41:21,348
and their own emotional and intellectual life.

572
00:41:22,516 --> 00:41:25,490
So we've seen a gradual change over three centuries,

573
00:41:25,616 --> 00:41:29,890
a rapid change over the last few decades.

574
00:41:30,290 --> 00:41:35,529
And for the farm animals this means that ways of raising animals

575
00:41:35,696 --> 00:41:39,800
that seemed perfectly modern and progressive even ten or twenty years ago,

576
00:41:39,900 --> 00:41:43,504
are becoming increasingly out of step with modern values.

577
00:41:51,145 --> 00:41:54,252
In terms of the complex emotions possessed by farm animals,

578
00:41:54,445 --> 00:41:58,652
a popular analogy can easily be applied:

579
00:41:58,852 --> 00:42:04,625
we may not be able to define it, but we certainly know it when we see it.

580
00:42:04,758 --> 00:42:06,398
Every day researchers are breaking new ground

581
00:42:06,558 --> 00:42:11,698
and allowing us solid glimpses into the emotional makeup of these animals.

582
00:42:15,302 --> 00:42:20,374
In June of 2004, researchers at Babraham institute,

583
00:42:20,474 --> 00:42:22,281
part of England's Cambridge University,

584
00:42:22,474 --> 00:42:27,281
announced they had discovered some profound qualities possessed by sheep.

585
00:42:27,815 --> 00:42:30,350
Qualities which will doubtless shed new light

586
00:42:30,417 --> 00:42:35,656
on our perception of the emotional and intellectual capacities of these animals.

587
00:42:39,827 --> 00:42:44,298
Individual sheep, it seems, can recognize up to fifty other sheep

588
00:42:44,398 --> 00:42:47,506
by facial features alone,

589
00:42:47,698 --> 00:42:52,506
and remember each of their faces after two years of separation.

590
00:42:54,107 --> 00:42:56,682
This recognition is based on facial characteristics

591
00:42:56,807 --> 00:43:02,082
that may differ by as little as 5-percent.

592
00:43:08,755 --> 00:43:12,295
It was also established that sheep have an overwhelmingly favorable response

593
00:43:12,455 --> 00:43:15,295
to humans that smile or laugh,

594
00:43:16,663 --> 00:43:19,867
as opposed to humans that frown or scowl.

595
00:43:23,103 --> 00:43:28,909
In the words of chief researcher neuroscientist dr. Keith Kendrick:

596
00:43:28,976 --> 00:43:32,383
This does open up the possibility that they have

597
00:43:32,576 --> 00:43:36,483
much richer emotional lives than we would give them credit for.

598
00:43:39,386 --> 00:43:44,262
Dr. Kendrick and his team believe these findings may offer

599
00:43:44,386 --> 00:43:48,762
valuable insights into human conditions like autism and schizophrenia.

600
00:43:58,605 --> 00:44:03,677
On a small farm in Machipango, Virginia, Jeffrey visits dr. Karen Davis,

601
00:44:03,944 --> 00:44:08,048
founder of United Poultry Concern, a non-profit organization

602
00:44:08,248 --> 00:44:11,189
dedicated to public education on the humane treatment

603
00:44:11,348 --> 00:44:15,089
and unique qualities of birds raised for food production.

604
00:44:15,289 --> 00:44:18,697
Have you come to see them as...

605
00:44:18,789 --> 00:44:23,297
as creatures with a healthy inner life, with a zest for life?

606
00:44:23,397 --> 00:44:25,599
Is this, is this a fantasy I have?

607
00:44:25,699 --> 00:44:27,468
Jeffrey, it is not a fantasy.

608
00:44:27,534 --> 00:44:29,169
Good, I'm glad to hear that.

609
00:44:29,236 --> 00:44:33,240
Chickens are very lively birds. They come from the jungles of South-East Asia.

610
00:44:33,340 --> 00:44:36,146
They live in extended family flocks

611
00:44:36,260 --> 00:44:39,146
that break up into small groups throughout the day.

612
00:44:39,413 --> 00:44:43,517
They like to dustbathe in the early to mid-afternoon,

613
00:44:43,617 --> 00:44:45,557
and also they take sunbaths,

614
00:44:45,617 --> 00:44:50,557
which are also vital to their health and wellbeing, hygiene, and proper nutritional health.

615
00:44:58,098 --> 00:45:00,300
They're making sounds.
Yes.

616
00:45:00,434 --> 00:45:02,773
Now, I firmly believe that we

617
00:45:02,874 --> 00:45:06,373
have yet to crack the code of most animal communication.

618
00:45:06,406 --> 00:45:07,442
I agree.

619
00:45:07,542 --> 00:45:11,378
What we hear is ordinary sounds, or probably very specific things.

620
00:45:11,478 --> 00:45:14,014
Do you have any idea what they're saying?

621
00:45:14,348 --> 00:45:16,788
Chickens are very vocal birds,

622
00:45:16,948 --> 00:45:20,888
and they would be calling to each other over large areas of space

623
00:45:21,021 --> 00:45:24,892
in the tropical forest where they come from.

624
00:45:28,762 --> 00:45:31,131
Roosters, for example, make what they call locator calls,

625
00:45:31,265 --> 00:45:35,802
where they will let other roosters with their hens know where they are.

626
00:45:35,935 --> 00:45:37,438
They keep tabs on each other.

627
00:45:37,538 --> 00:45:42,376
They will notify one another about overhead predators, like a hawk,

628
00:45:42,509 --> 00:45:44,780
and they certainly notify each other about food sources,

629
00:45:44,909 --> 00:45:48,484
and probably many things in the environment

630
00:45:48,609 --> 00:45:50,484
that may elude us.

631
00:45:50,584 --> 00:45:53,487
But they are not just making noises.

632
00:46:00,961 --> 00:46:03,397
The further into his writing Jeffrey get,

633
00:46:03,497 --> 00:46:08,339
the more he realizes that when referring to the emotions of farm animals,

634
00:46:08,497 --> 00:46:12,639
he has to take into account the effect their emotions have on our emotions.

635
00:46:13,574 --> 00:46:16,581
Every place he has been to, everyone he has talked with Е

636
00:46:16,684 --> 00:46:20,681
they all have stories of deep-felt personal experiences,

637
00:46:20,814 --> 00:46:27,421
where the emotions of the animals they have gotten to know have, in-kind, affected emotions of their own.

638
00:46:28,355 --> 00:46:31,561
No one who has spent considerable quality time with these animals

639
00:46:31,665 --> 00:46:35,761
comes away, it seems, without having experienced some sense of wonderment -

640
00:46:37,028 --> 00:46:41,006
thoughts and feelings they never for a moment felt could be attributed

641
00:46:41,128 --> 00:46:46,006
to pigs, cows, sheep, chickens or turkeys.

642
00:46:48,776 --> 00:46:52,517
And when those who have lived the experience, see it happening to others around them,

643
00:46:52,776 --> 00:46:56,517
it often becomes a magical moment.

644
00:46:57,818 --> 00:47:02,256
Jan Hamilton is the founder of Wilderness Ranch in Loveland, Colorado.

645
00:47:02,389 --> 00:47:06,493
We rescued turkeys off of a dead pile.

646
00:47:06,627 --> 00:47:11,404
There were literally four hundred or so turkeys piled up on this dead pile.

647
00:47:11,627 --> 00:47:16,804
And so they were in every stage of decay and dying, and some of them were alive.

648
00:47:16,970 --> 00:47:19,840
We brought fourteen turkeys home.

649
00:47:20,040 --> 00:47:24,912
We had a group of community service kids working out here,

650
00:47:25,078 --> 00:47:28,618
and one of the kids that was there was the toughest kid I've ever seen out here.

651
00:47:28,878 --> 00:47:31,518
I thought it was almost hopeless to have her out here.

652
00:47:31,618 --> 00:47:35,794
And she observed the turkeys coming in

653
00:47:35,918 --> 00:47:40,794
and saw that we were picking maggotts off of them and trying to keep them alive

654
00:47:40,894 --> 00:47:44,164
syringe feeding them and what bad shape they were in.

655
00:47:44,298 --> 00:47:47,401
And the next week she was much more civil.

656
00:47:47,501 --> 00:47:51,105
And the following week she actually was helping and asking questions

657
00:47:51,205 --> 00:47:54,475
and being really involved in what we were doing.

658
00:47:54,608 --> 00:47:58,837
And, at the end of the time she was here, I asked her:

659
00:47:58,872 --> 00:48:02,936
What made the difference, what happened, what happened with you?

660
00:48:04,280 --> 00:48:07,953
And she said the turkeys really got to her,

661
00:48:08,856 --> 00:48:14,862
and that they had been abused as she had been and she could see the connection.

662
00:48:15,129 --> 00:48:19,133
And as she left she said: What you do here is really awesome.

663
00:48:27,274 --> 00:48:29,146
The reason that I do this

664
00:48:29,274 --> 00:48:32,146
is because I know that animals have feelings,

665
00:48:32,246 --> 00:48:34,145
I know they have relationships,

666
00:48:34,246 --> 00:48:38,185
and that they deserve like every other being

667
00:48:38,319 --> 00:48:41,889
to have the full expression of their essence, whatever that is.

668
00:48:42,022 --> 00:48:45,592
And that's what we want to teach here, that's what this is all about for me.

669
00:48:45,692 --> 00:48:47,863
It's not that I think farm animals are more important or more interesting

670
00:48:47,992 --> 00:48:49,863
than any other creature on the earth.

671
00:48:50,063 --> 00:48:52,933
We all deserve to live in harmony and abundance,

672
00:48:53,033 --> 00:48:55,436
and the way to get there is by respecting each other,

673
00:48:55,536 --> 00:48:58,238
and that's what Wilderness Ranch is all about.

674
00:49:03,210 --> 00:49:05,447
From the day Jeffrey started to write this book,

675
00:49:05,547 --> 00:49:10,084
he was sure he'd learned just enough about farm animals over his lifetime

676
00:49:10,184 --> 00:49:12,653
to know where his research would lead him.

677
00:49:12,753 --> 00:49:17,324
Few times in his life, he admits, has he been so wrong.

678
00:49:17,424 --> 00:49:20,232
If I'm guilty of underestimating the ability these animals have

679
00:49:20,334 --> 00:49:25,232
to relate to us on such a profound emotional level,

680
00:49:25,399 --> 00:49:28,368
believe me, I am but one among millions.

681
00:49:28,469 --> 00:49:30,674
We accept dogs and cats into our lives

682
00:49:30,869 --> 00:49:33,874
so freely, so readily, so lovingly.

683
00:49:33,974 --> 00:49:37,352
Yet, after an entire year of traveling throughout the world,

684
00:49:37,474 --> 00:49:39,752
visiting farm animal sanctuaries,

685
00:49:39,974 --> 00:49:42,852
where, for the most part, these animals can just be themselves,

686
00:49:42,974 --> 00:49:44,852
I'm beginning to wonder

687
00:49:44,952 --> 00:49:51,024
how we came to discriminate between a pig and a dog, or a chicken and a cat?

688
00:49:51,125 --> 00:49:53,065
Where did it start, and why?

689
00:49:53,125 --> 00:49:58,065
There are no simple answers, no profound words of wisdom to impart here.

690
00:49:58,165 --> 00:50:02,704
All I can do as a writer is tell you, in as honest a manor as possible,

691
00:50:02,804 --> 00:50:07,012
my experiences, and the stories of those who have dedicated their lives

692
00:50:07,114 --> 00:50:12,012
to bettering our understanding of these magnificent animals.

693
00:50:12,412 --> 00:50:17,785
The experiences I have had with farm animals are some I will never forget.

694
00:50:17,951 --> 00:50:19,757
Yet, these are my experiences;

695
00:50:19,951 --> 00:50:23,357
and just like me on the day I began to research this book,

696
00:50:23,457 --> 00:50:27,161
experiences of your own are just a mouse-click away.

697
00:50:27,261 --> 00:50:28,796
See for yourself.

698
00:50:28,829 --> 00:50:31,502
Somewhere near you is a place where you can go

699
00:50:31,629 --> 00:50:35,702
and meet a pig, a cow, a chicken or a turkey.

700
00:50:35,803 --> 00:50:38,242
With your sense of curiosity fully in play,

701
00:50:38,403 --> 00:50:42,242
I think you'll be surprised at what you'll find.

702
00:50:42,443 --> 00:50:50,751
Their emotions may impact your emotions forever.

 
 
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